Sunday, September 9, 2012

A Modest Political Suggestion



     Once again it is election season in America and with that comes a storm of heated hyperbole.  In midst of all the mudslinging and powerful rhetoric I have noticed behavior that makes me increasingly frustrated and disappointed.  So disappointed in fact that I, a citizen who normally avoids political discourse, have been motivated to speak out.  Concerning politics I have a simple suggestion; it is a policy that I thought was common sense, and should be applied universally, not only to the current political situation, but to all political discourse from now on. This policy is simple:

"No matter your party affiliation, political leanings, or individual background, it is possible to disagree with someone without personally attacking them.  The President of the United States is our elected Commander in Chief, the representative and figurehead of our Nation, and whether or not you agree with his policies, the President deserves your civility and respect."

There is no harder job in the world than being the President of the United States.  If all of his responsibilities were put into a job description you couldn't pay an average person enough to take it.  The President has the weight of the Country on his shoulders, is constantly vigilant defending the security and well-being of his citizens, while the rest of the world bickers in his ear.  He faces difficult decisions which could result in the deaths of American service men and women, and must live constantly with the outcomes of these decisions.  In the face of political opposition he tries to negotiate an uphill battle to introduce and pass legislation through congress, all the while his every move is under 24 hour media scrutiny.  He gets no days off, he never gets to clock out, and at every turn is someone else who wants to talk about work. Imagine yourself facing this kind of daily responsibility, and then imagine that after all this, at the end of the day, is a mis-informed heckler yelling obscenities at you.

If you disagree with the President's policies or the way his administration is running the country, that is your right as citizens of a democracy. I only ask that you express this disagreement through civil, rational debate, through voting, or through peaceful protest; I encourage you to compose well-worded letters to your representatives and work together to nominate a candidate to replace him that shares your views. And I would like to see a situation where, If and when your candidate is elected you can count on your opponents to voice their dissatisfaction the same way. That even though the new President's views differ from their own, they can still extend to him the respect he deserves.

Thank you for listening,
Grant David Anderson II


7 comments:

  1. Its a free country and I should be able to say anything I want! If I want to call the President a fucking idiot, that is my God-given right as an American!

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    1. While the President asked for the job, ran for it, spent a boat load of cash to get there, he should also have respect for the position and act accordingly. Too bad our current chief executive doesn't respect the office, the congress or the judicial branch. I am no longer in the military and no longer have to yes, Mr. President to anything he thinks is a good idea. Too bad the guy from the mail room of political life got elected to the CEO position.

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    2. Its not about saying "Yes, Mr President." To his ideas, its just having the common decency to not personally insult him. I don't agree with all of his policies either, but that doesn't mean I wouldn't be pleasant if I got the opportunity to shake his hand.

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  2. "It is possible to disagree with someone without personally attacking them."
    I really like this policy. And I also agree that it should be applied universally. In my opinion it should not just be applied to any political discourse, but to all interactions between people. After reading this blog though, especially after seeing the "Unwanted Correspondence" section, I find it hard to believe that the author of this page actually agrees with his own policy. You should have the common decency to not personally insult anybody, not just Mr. President.

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    1. Interesting observation. However, in the case of the "Unwanted Correspondence" section, the keyword there is Unwanted. I regard those emails with the same vehemence I regard un-solicited phone calls and junk mail.

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